H is for hot job!

This hot job post really has me stumped. Everyone knows what I mean by a hot job right? A rush job…gotta have it asap!

Is it a hot job, a hot-hot job, or a scorcher? As a client you might be surprised at how many hot jobs we have in production at a time. The worst moment for a sales person is when the hot job that was pushed through the shop doesn’t ship on the due date because we don’t have shipping instructions.

There have only been a few instances when I’ve not been able to produce a hot job for a client. For those few it wasn’t realistic because the job itself could not be completed in the time frame requested. It just wasn’t possible, there simply were not enough hours in anyone’s day to produce the job.  Do you know how much time you should allow in your schedule for your job to print?

The hot job could be anything from a post card to a multi-page perfect bound catalog. The production schedule required for a post card compared to a catalog is completely different. The post card job requires a single sheet of paper, simple in its press imposition and bindery work.  In comparison, a multi-page catalog can require much more time in prepress and proofing. The additional pages would also require more press runs and added bindery time for folding, gathering and binding the catalog.  Printers & designers must also take into account the time that clients will keep the proof out for approval; and, when it returns from the client, how many edits or changes they need.  If alterations are requested a new proof is required. It is difficult for printers to know the time required for proofing and possible changes clients might make.

Production schedules are easy to make but also underutilized today. Make a plan with your printer to establish production schedules based on true need. It’s like the boy who cried wolf…sadly if it happens too often, your true cry for assistance might be ignored. OK…OK…doubt it, but I had to try.

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2 thoughts on “H is for hot job!

  1. and what the heck is “no shipping info” about? You have no idea how many times I get a “hot job” yet they do not know where they are supposed to go. How is that possible?

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